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Hackers Keen On Attacking iOS and Android Banking Apps

February 24, 2014 | By Editor 

IOS Hacking

The mobile space is not so safe for all transactions that users do on a day to day basis, according to a research submitted by a security firm. The team after briefly analyzing the risks involved in this sector and the type of malware that targets mobile operating systems, revealed that hackers are often interested in hacking banking APPS. The detailed report also unveiled a shocking truth for the user community. Earlier, it was believed that free APPS are the most infected of all.

Malware developers will often try to intercept APPS on the way to inject them with specific virus or trojans so that once installed on a phone device, it will automatically start sending anonymous data to the third party. Websites online are protected by SSL Certificates while a similar type of solutions is expected to roll out for all mobile platforms. The survey revealed out of all paid apps, everything is compromised on the Android platform. Apple is considered safer at the moment because only 56% of their paid APPS on iOS platform has been compromised.

Even though, this doesn’t directly convert into a claim that every app you download on the Android OS is a malware, the potential risks are exceptionally heavy than what was assumed so far? One of the main security practice that companies and security firms suggest is that stick to the original stores intended for the download purpose. Trying to download apps from a third party store has most chances of getting compromised and being hacked.

Always using websites with SSL Certificates is considered to be a safer bet when dealing with banking and online shopping activities. Most APPS targeted from these third party stores are banking APPS. They are strongly after banking credentials such as usernames, passwords, personal information as well as account number. Sometimes, it involves debit and credit card details as well as they can be hacked once all details are retrieved.

The majority of free APPS are targeted and compromised by hackers because they are much easier to break into than paid ones. In 2013, nearly 53% free APPS on iOS were hacked while the number is high at 73 percent on Android. By default, Android allows users to stick to Google Play Store for added protection.

The security provided by SSL Certificates or similar encryption methods protect users from losing their information to these hackers. The number of too many Android version continues to be a constraint for the OS to make its mark and become a secured platform for users.

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